Create Your Heart Out, Then Let Destiny Decide

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When I make something (whether I’m writing, sewing, knitting, or drawing), it’s easy to get caught up in what others will think. I see the flaws — the awkward wording,  the mismatched points, the uneven decreases, the distorted proportions — and assume everyone else will see the same things and hate the finished product because of them. But that’s not how it works.

I just finished a quilt that is simple, about as basic as my quilting can get. When I gave it to my friend as a gift,  I was embarrassed, sure she would think it was boring and plain. To my astonishment, she adores it. She loves the colors and is so happy to have this hand-made gift. She sees it with different eyes, with a different heart.

Square Dance, pieced and machine-quilted by Kit Dunsmore
Square Dance, pieced and machine-quilted by Kit Dunsmore

While I’m pleasantly surprised by her response, the most important thing about this is the reminder that I do not decide the value of my work. I must simply make the things I am compelled to make and send them out into the world. After that, destiny decides.

Author: Kit Dunsmore

Kit is a writer and an artist who adores living in Colorado. Whether she's hiking in the mountains or walking the prairies, she's always watching the wildlife in order to learn more about the natural world.

9 thoughts on “Create Your Heart Out, Then Let Destiny Decide”

  1. I agree with your friend, it is a beautiful quilt! One thing we need to remember is that the “imperfections” we see in our handmade items often times are the most cherished thing about the item to the receiver.

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    1. Your point about imperfections is something I know so well. I love the wonkiness and human-touch evident in handmade items. You’d think I’d be better about allowing for it in my own work.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Lovely post! Its all too easy to notice the imperfections in our own work but others certainly don’t look at them that way, especially when they appreciate the love and care that you have put into making something.

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    1. Thanks. There are judgmental people out there ready to pick things apart. (Quilt Police, for example.) I need the reminder that things don’t have to be perfect in order to be valued.

      Liked by 1 person

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