Ignoring Fear + Embracing Failure = Learning to Create

A few weeks ago, I found out about Sketchbook Skool’s online drawing lessons taught by artists I know from my collection of art journaling books. I can spend hours gazing at the pictures in these books, loving how someone has captured a moment or place or person in their lives. I find myself longing to do the same, to get out one of my sketchbooks and draw the details of my life, but that’s where I freeze. The gap between what I see in my head and what winds up on the paper is often huge, and my past disappointments can weigh me down. Knowing that I can’t draw exactly what I see keeps me from picking up my pencil at all. Why bother when I know I will be disappointed with the results?

I found the answer in an article by Danny Gregory, one of the founders of the Sketchbook Skool. Learning to Teach Beginners is about the teaching philosophy of Sketchbook Skool. When I read it, I realized I had found an art teacher who understood what had been holding me back all these years.

fearOfWrong

I’ve been interested in drawing since I was a child, but most of my schooling is in science and math. As a teen, my younger sister drew well. I envied her skill. She could draw people she saw in her head and they looked like people. My people might look human, but rarely like what I imagined or saw. I gave up, frustrated by my lack of success, embarrassed by my mistakes.

I wish I could have read then what Danny Gregory has to say about learning to draw:

The most difficult and crucial lesson for beginners is the importance of failure. You need to make a lot of mistakes. You need to feel good about those mistakes and recognize that they are opportunities to improve. You can’t allow those errors to overwhelm you and make you feel hopeless. —Danny Gregory

He also mentions that failing doesn’t make us failures. It makes us students. I thought my drawing mistakes were a sign that I didn’t have the gift for art.

I’ve since realized that my sister doesn’t have a gift either. She has a hard-won skill. When we were young, she spent a lot of time drawing. She had a sketchbook in her lap and a pen in her hand whenever the family watched TV. She practiced, she made mistakes, she paid attention, she learned. She studied art in college, but she did the real learning, her work as a beginner, as a child. Her gift was to stick with it and keep trying.

Thanks to Gregory’s article, I found the courage to sign up for the Kourse called “Beginnings”. My first session is this Friday. I’m excited and I’m terrified. Whenever I feel the fear, I remind myself it’s an online class. I don’t have to show my work to anyone if I don’t really want to. But I have also decided that this class is my chance to make mistakes, to see what I can learn. I imagine the fear will stay with me for a while. I don’t like being wrong or looking stupid, but I’m also tired of standing outside the proverbial candy store with my nose pressed to the glass. All those people recording their life in drawings in their journals! I want to do that! And that want, for this moment at least, outweighs the fear.

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Kit Dunsmore

Kit Dunsmore has believed in the magic underlying the muggle world since she was a child searching for the Shetland pony pooka she was sure was hiding in her back yard. She learned early on that books were magic doors into other worlds, and that she could revisit a beloved character or place by opening the right book. As she grew, she decided she wanted to make magic with words, too. Today Kit writes about things she loves: poodles and dragons, witches and artists, quirky underdogs and loyal friends. Whether her setting is 6th-century England, the imaginary Twelve Kingdoms, or an art-obsessed version of modern America, magic always finds its way into her story. She enjoys turning fairy tales inside out and watching characters sacrifice everything to reach their goal, but she also believes in happy endings. When she isn't writing, Kit experiences magic by making things with her hands. Over the years, she's made quilts, fabric sculptures, collages, sweaters, and blank books. Her newest interest is learning how to spin her own yarn, a skill guaranteed to strengthen one of her many delusions: that she is a self-sufficient pioneer woman. She also thinks she is a hobbit, a witch, an artist, and a good cook. Living in the foothills of Colorado, Kit enjoys the giant skies and prairie landscapes which suit her need for wide open spaces. In addition to hiking through glorious scenery with her husband or imagining herself living in the Middle Ages, Kit works as a pillow for her miniature poodle and polishes the next small piece of her handmade life.

6 thoughts on “Ignoring Fear + Embracing Failure = Learning to Create”

  1. I can identify with your feelings and your journey. Growing up, I accepted that my two older sisters were the artists on the family. Whenever I tried to draw, my pictures came out clumsy and ill proportioned. When my sisters-who were older and had been doing it longer-drew something it seemed effortless and perfect. I gave up. Only recently have I had the courage to try drawing again, and that came about because of a photo/watercolor app that never colored my photos the way I wanted them to be colored. So my incredibly nurturing husband began encouraging me to think about painting. And before I paint, I want to be comfortable drawing.

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    1. Sounds like you have the perfect husband! I’m pretty sure Sketchbook Skool is going to suggest I draw daily, and I’m sure that sort of regular practice will make a difference. It will be interesting to see how it goes. You’ll have to keep me posted on your own drawing adventures!

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  2. Wise words from Danny Gregory. Very difficult to accept in a medium such as drawing where your (perceived) imperfections are right there in front of you. I hope the course is wonderful and inspiring. Enjoy.

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    1. Thanks! If comments from the other students are anything to go by, it should be both wonderful and inspiring. I’m nervous and excited and a little nervous. Wait. I said that already, didn’t I? 😉

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