Tools I Used Writing My 8th NaNoWriMo Novel

My magic NaNoWriMo hoodie. I wore this every time I wrote.
My magic NaNoWriMo hoodie. I wore this every time I wrote.

 

November is over and I’ve won NaNoWriMo* for the 8th year in a row. By this time, you’d think I’d be bored or feel like writing 50,000 words in 30 days was getting routine. I was worried that might happen, so I made a point of trying some new things this year, with surprising results.

The first thing I did was add a goal of producing a complete story with a beginning, middle, and end. Most of my previous endings were quick summaries of where I wanted everything to wind up, coming hard on the heels of an overly long beginning with little to no middle. This year, I was determined to produce a draft with all the components of my story and I did it, mainly because of some new techniques I tried.

First, I tried a little planning. I do not like outlines and too much planning kills my stories dead, so I kept it simple. I decided on three major events and used them as guideposts for the 25, 50, and 75% points in the story. Then I made a point of writing to each scene with the allotted word count by including only the most important moments leading up to it and sketching in the rest. I had to adjust my word count goals because I wrote more than I needed to (15,200 words instead of 12,500 for 25%, for example), but I kept working to hit the scenes on schedule.

The “sketching” was done using two handy tricks. First, I summarized the boring parts. When people needed to get from one place to another, I didn’t bother writing real scenes. I just wrote a few paragraphs about what needed to happen on the way. Second, I followed some great advice I got from Judy Fort Brenneman: I skimped on description. I found this challenging, because I enjoy writing description. I had to force myself to list the things I wanted to include in a scene instead of describing things in detail, but it really worked. Not only did I save words for the critical story stuff, but it also saved time, because crafting vivid descriptions requires thought. If there is one thing I mustn’t do during NaNoWriMo, it’s think too much. I’ll never finish otherwise.

The other big challenge for me was coming up with the complications and obstacles that happen in the middle of the story. I fed my muse with a list I made of all the things I thought would be great to have in my fantasy, adventurous things I always enjoyed reading about as a teen. Whenever I was feeling stuck and wondering what was going to happen next, I’d read my list. Something on it would jump out (like “kidnapping” or “prince in disguise”) and get lodged in my head. Then, overnight, my magical muse would take my threadbare idea and turn it into a stunning ball gown complete with jewelry and shoes.

The other thing I tried that was more help than I expected was drawing my story ideas on paper. When I had to plot out a journey, I drew little scenes to make a map. At first, they were disconnected. Then I added tracks and paths, and places in between. The events were still vague when I was done, but an inspiring detail came from that drawing. The mountains they were heading for wound up on an island instead of the mainland, which gave me a chance to add a sailing ship and a voyage, and that generated some great complications and dire circumstances.

Thanks to these techniques, I achieved my goals. My 2013 NaNoWriMo draft is over 63,000 words long, but it has a beginning, a middle, and an end. Even more surprising, it’s a complex and interesting story that has already given me ideas for a sequel. However, I think the most important thing that happened in November was that I learned some new ways to approach draft writing. Staring down the blank page is one of the hardest parts of being a writer, so I am grateful to have found some new ways to feed my muse and help move my story through the dark reaches of the unknown.

*NaNoWriMo = National Novel Writing Month, aka November. The goal is to write a 50,000-word novel in 30 days.

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Kit Dunsmore

Kit Dunsmore has believed in the magic underlying the muggle world since she was a child searching for the Shetland pony pooka she was sure was hiding in her back yard. She learned early on that books were magic doors into other worlds, and that she could revisit a beloved character or place by opening the right book. As she grew, she decided she wanted to make magic with words, too. Today Kit writes about things she loves: poodles and dragons, witches and artists, quirky underdogs and loyal friends. Whether her setting is 6th-century England, the imaginary Twelve Kingdoms, or an art-obsessed version of modern America, magic always finds its way into her story. She enjoys turning fairy tales inside out and watching characters sacrifice everything to reach their goal, but she also believes in happy endings. When she isn't writing, Kit experiences magic by making things with her hands. Over the years, she's made quilts, fabric sculptures, collages, sweaters, and blank books. Her newest interest is learning how to spin her own yarn, a skill guaranteed to strengthen one of her many delusions: that she is a self-sufficient pioneer woman. She also thinks she is a hobbit, a witch, an artist, and a good cook. Living in the foothills of Colorado, Kit enjoys the giant skies and prairie landscapes which suit her need for wide open spaces. In addition to hiking through glorious scenery with her husband or imagining herself living in the Middle Ages, Kit works as a pillow for her miniature poodle and polishes the next small piece of her handmade life.

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